• Notes From Ghana

    Cuisine in Ghana

    I am back in Ghana after a long rejuvenating visit at home. This is our last year in Ghana and I hope to fill it with as many experiences as possible and to share them with you, so watch this space!

  • Notes From Ghana

    Nothern Region

    I am told that British diplomats are taught to ask “How is the development in the north?” whenever there was an uncomfortable pause in a conversation at a cocktail party or official event. They are told that this works in almost every developing country as very often the north is less developed than the south.

  • Notes From Ghana

    Tanzania – Land of many jewels

    After a few days in Arusha, we embarked on our safari. The first stop was Lake Manyara. This park was beautiful, resplendent with baboons, giraffes, impala, elephants, zebras and more. There were even vervet monkeys with bright blue bottoms. Giraffe sitting on the banks of Lake Manyara   We felt as if we were living an episode of National Geographic. We quickly realised that animals in the zoo are just a shadow of themselves. Out here they were bigger, their coats were healthier and the colours were nothing like we imagined. The animals moved with confidence; it was clear who was in charge. Lake Manyara is a relatively small park and…

  • Notes From Ghana

    The Bitter with the Sweet

    I clearly recall two of the fears that I had as a child; being attacked by killer bees and being placed in a situation where I had to eat unusual and unappetizing food. The seeds of both of these fears were planted by movies, the second one after I watched Indiana Jones being presented with a bowl of live, writhing eel like creatures. My horror was so great that, despite my love for travel, I resigned myself at an early age never to travel to Africa or Asia for fear of being presented with a bizarre dish that I could not refuse. Fast forward to 2011 and I am not…

  • Notes From Ghana

    The Law of the Road

    One of my first posts was about the vendors on the streets of Accra. As I am writing this, the streets of Accra are no longer littered with vendors wending their way between cars selling everything under the sun. The government began enforcing the ban on street vending, successfully clearing the streets of hawkers. They have left a considerable void and it is significant enough an event that I will interrupt my discussion on Tanzania to discuss it.

  • Notes From Ghana

    Tanzania – Second stop, Arusha

    On the second leg of our April trip to Tanzania, we left Zanzibar and flew to Arusha, the safari capital of Tanzania. We were immediately relieved by the temperature in Arusha. The city, which has grown from a town to city in a relatively short period of time, is 1400 meters above sea level and the days are pleasantly cool. The growth of the city can be attributed to its proximity to some of Africa’s most famous landscapes and parks, namely Mount Kilimanjaro, the Serengeti, Lake Manyara, the Ngorongoro Crater and the Olduvai Gorge. The city is very green and fairly clean, and a nice respite from some of the…

  • Notes From Ghana

    Tanzania – First stop, Zanzibar

    Jambo! I finally made it to East Africa! Since I read the comment “you visit East Africa for the animals and West Africa for the people”, I have been yearning to visit the eastern shore of the continent. Ghana has its own charms, but the only large animals native to the country are elephants at the Mole National Park which is in the North of the country, a two-day trip from Accra. I also heard much about Eastern Africa and how different it was. I really felt that my time in Africa would be incomplete if I did not sample as much of its diverse culture as I could.

  • Notes From Ghana

    Trashy Bags

    It is March, the Harmattan is over and Ghana is hot!!! I know we complained about the Harmattan and the dust and allergies and so on, but the dust brought with it cooler temperatures, especially in the evenings. The hot weather brings instead a high demand for drinking water. Enter the “sachet water”.

  • Notes From Ghana

    A woman’s place

    If one had to place women, children and men on a ladder of importance in Ghana, it would be exactly in that order. Women at the lowest rung, children above them, pregnant women might fit in above the kids and the men on the top.

  • Notes From Ghana

    The Ghanaian Bazaar

    I love going to bazaars in Ghana. Basically each bazaar is a collection of 30 – 40 vendors selling all sorts of wares – beads, furniture, clothes, artwork, books, craft, jewelery, the works. It is normally in the open air; each vendor with a table, under a canopy. There is often music, entertainment and games for children. The result is a colourful, festive carnival-like environment.